People of Sage

Jane Clarence

Mrs. Jane Clarence, wife of William Clarence who was a former Baptist Minister, passed away shortly before Christmas, on December 23, 1946. She had been ill with liver cancer and was hospitalized at St. Mary’s hospital in St. Louis at the time of her death. She was born on September 9, 1876 the daughter of Baptiste and Caroline (nee Mudd) Hayden near St. Paul, Missouri.

She leaves behind a brother Tom Hayden (father of William Hayden) and a sister Lula Hayden of St. Louis.  Her father Baptiste had been born a slave on the Dyer Farm and was the son of James Hayden who had been brought as a slave from Virginia. Slave owner George Dyer had freed his slaves (who were the dower and property of Margaret Hayden 1801 KY-1849 MO and who is buried in the Molitor Cemetery) in 1861, when Baptiste was only six years old.  George had given his former slave James Hayden, Jane’s grandfather, 43 acres of land west of St. Paul and north of Josephville, on Survey 3035, for the loving care of his mother Mamie Adaway Dyer, George Dyer’s former house servant. When James Hayden died in 1897, his son Baptiste Hayden  (Jane’s father)  would inherit a portion of this same land. (This is established through records of the St. Charles County Circuit Court records in Probate files.)After a funeral in St. Louis at the Hoppe Funeral Home, Jane was brought home to O’Fallon and buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery on December 27, 1946.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

(Special thanks to Cheryl Hibbler and Joe Meier for the help with this research)

People of Sage

George Sanders

George Sanders passed away on May 6, 1940 and was buried in Sage Chapel Cemetery. He was living with his daughter Mary, who lovingly cared for him in her home in St. Louis. He had suffered a stroke in 1934, and was paralyzed and had several other health issues. His wife Mary Ellen Thomas (March 1874-December 1, 1915), and three of his children, son Carl Rodgers Sanders (February 2, 1900-April 13, 1937), and daughters Agnes Sanders (December 24, 1912-January 29, 1915).and Ardell Sanders (August 1, 1909-February 1, 1911) had preceded him, and were also buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery as well.  He had been born a slave in about 1860, the son of Tuck and Mary (Hunter) Sanders in Lincoln County, the property of Mary Sanders in Hurricane. George and his wife Mary Ellen Thomas had moved near O’Fallon in the 1880s to raise a family and be close to her family in St. Paul . He had worked his whole life as a laborer, raising ten children alone after his sweet wife had passed three weeks after their youngest daughter Agnes was born in 1915. He leaves behind William C. Sanders (June 11, 1889-November 24, 1961), Andrew Sanders (March 17, 1892-December 23, 1944), George F. Sanders (April 3, 1895-September 16, 1943 World War I Veteran and buried at Jefferson Barracks), Taylor M. Sanders (April 1, 1898-February 10, 1953 buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery), Lemmie Sanders (May 11, 1909-March 24, 1958),  Mary Jane Sanders (August 3, 1909-November 8, 1948 at Sage Chapel), and Theresa Catherine Sanders (November 20-1915-July 15, 2000). George Sanders was buried in Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

People of Sage

Carl R. Sanders

Carl Rodgers Sanders passed away while in Illinois, on April 13, 1937, leaving behind his wife Bessie.* He and his wife were living at 1421 Blair in St. Louis. He was born in O’Fallon, Missouri, the son of George and Mary Ellen (Thomas) Sanders. His mother passed away when he was just fifteen and he lived with various relatives and friends growing up. When he was nineteen he worked as a hired hand for Joseph Sigmund in St.Paul. He leaves behind several brothers and sisters, William C. Sanders (June 11, 1889-November 24, 1961), Andrew Sanders (March 17, 1892-December 23, 1944), George F. Sanders (April 3, 1895-September 16, 1943 World War I Veteran and buried at Jefferson Barracks), Taylor M. Sanders (April 1, 1898-February 10, 1953 buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery), Lemmie Sanders (May 11, 1909-March 24, 1958),  Mary Jane Sanders (August 3, 1909-November 8, 1948 at Sage Chapel), and Theresa Catherine Sanders (November 20-1915-July 15, 2000). He was preceded in death by his sisters Adell Sanders (August 1, 1909-February 1, 1911 and buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery) and Agnes Sanders (December 24, 1912-January 29, 1915 buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery).Carl Sanders was buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

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In September of 2017, Karolyn Terpstra located pieces of the broken headstone of Carl R. Sanders.  Terpstra is President of the O’Fallon (MO) Historical Society and Chairman of the O’Fallon Historic Preservation Commission (CLG).

*A special thanks goes to Justin Watkins too, for his assistance on this extra hard story.

People of Sage

Schylar Sallee

Eighteen- year-old Georgia Mae “Schylar” Sallee passed away on Monday, July 27, 1931 from Epilepsy. She was born in O’Fallon, on June 24, 1913 and is preceded in death by her father Charley Sallee, her brother David Grant Sallee and a sister  Mary Elizabeth Sallee all laid to rest at Sage Chapel Cemetery. She leaves behind her mother Ardelia, nee Abington, and two sisters Leola and Lauretta. The family was served by the Nieburg Funeral Home of Wright City and she was buried in Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

People of Sage

Charles Sallee

Charles “Charley” Edward Sallee passed away after a lengthy heart illness on February 9, 1929, near Wright City. He had been born in Callaway County, at New Richland near Fulton, on April 3, 1878 (1879), to John Sallee who died when he was a baby, and raised by his uncle James Henry and his wife Edie (nee Clark) Sallee. He moved to O’Fallon as a young man and lived north of town on the Salt River Road. He  worked as a farmer and this was where he met Ardalia Abington, a daughter of John Abington who lived with his sister Cora White on “the Hill”. On March 15, 1918 he and Ardalia were married  in O’Fallon, Missouri at Wishwell Baptist Churh. Charley was preceded in death by his newborn son David Grant Sallee (7/4/1910-7/5/1910), and a little daughter Mary Elizabeth Sallee (6/4/1918-5/26/1919), both of whom are also buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery. He leaves behind his wife Ardalia, daughter Georgia Mae “Schylar” Sallee, Leola Margaret Sallee (Ball) and Lauretta Sallee (Luckett), at their home where they had recently moved. The family was served by the Nieburg Funeral Home of Wright City and Charley was buried in the O’Fallon Colored Church Cemetery, also known as Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

News Release

Support the Nomination

Sage Chapel Cemetery is being Nominated to the National Register of Historic Places. A hearing by the Missouri Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (Agenda Here) to consider referral to the U.S. National Park Service will take place in the Lewis and Clark State Office Building, La Charrette Conference Room, 1101 Riverside Dr., Jefferson City, Missouri on August 10, 2018 at 10 a.m.. A Copy of the Nomination can be found here and this is a public meeting open to comment.  This nomination is being made in behalf of all of those buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery and support is greatly appreciated.

 

 

People of Sage

Jessie White

Jessie White died at her home in O’Fallon, Missouri Sunday, November 20, 1927 of complications with Tuberculosis. She was born the daughter of Simon and Cora (Abington) White and had grown up and lived on “the Hill” her entire life. Born on November 4, 1908, she had just reached her eighteenth birthday. She leaves behind several brothers and sisters; Flossie, Arthur, Sylvester, Beulah, Thomas, Eugene, Corinne, and Harry. The family was served by the Keithly Funeral home and she was buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

People of Sage

Mary Brady

Maria Brady passed away March 8, 1924.  She was born enslaved in Missouri about August of 1858 to Reuben and Pheby Carter. She grew up in west Saint Charles County near Wentzville. On the 15th of January, 1894 she married Frank Brady. Mary had five children., Charley born 1882, Myrtle born 1884, Alex born 1895 (UMKC Board) and Eli born 1895. She and Frank adopted and raised Adam and Leonard Galloway. Served by the Keithly Funeral Home, she was laid to rest in Sage Chapel Cemetery.

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Mary Brady’s husband Frank Brady. Photo from the O’Fallon Missouri Historical Society and Mary Stephenson.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

People of Sage

Thomas Clarence

Thomas Clarence was born in Kentucky in about 1877. He and his brother William were a Baptist family who had come north looking for work. Married and divorced he had worked many jobs, at the shoe factory, as a steelworker, and even as a carpenter. Previously he had lived in St. Louis, but had come to live with family in Gilmore, a railroad town in St. Charles County west of O’Fallon. He had been ill with pneumonia for over three months when he died of a lung hemorrhage on October 23, 1923.  Served by the Keithly Funeral Home, he was laid to rest in Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

People of Sage

Mary Edwards

Mary Edwards passed away of tuberculosis on November 20, 1921. She was born enslaved on June 18, in about 1855 or 1856, to Charles and Martha Stone, who were both born slaves in Missouri. She grew up in north Saint Louis County along the Missouri River near Baden. She and her husband Jim Edwards, grew up together, were childhood friends, and they married at the close of the Civil War. Mary bore eleven children, ten of which survived. They were Marshall (who preceded her and is also buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery), Diane (1875), John (1877) Sophia (1881), Louis (1886), Alvin “Trevy” (who preceded her and is also buried at Sage Chapel Cemetery) George “Sedell” (1891), Lena (1895) Mamie (1910) and Slater (1898). She moved to today’s O’Fallon right after James and she married, and they made their home on St. Peters Road, later referred to as “the hill”, today known as Sonderen. She was buried by the Keithly Funeral home. Mary lays buried in Sage Chapel Cemetery.

On August 20th, in 1881, Mahala (Keithly) and her husband Jasper Costlio had transferred to the Trustees of an African Methodist Episcopal Church for the use by the  Conference, one acre of land, which became known as Sage Chapel Cemetery. This was done so that the former slaves of  Samuel Keithly could continue to be buried in this cemetery. That same deed conveyed a one-half acre parcel on Sonderen Street to be used for a church known as Sage’s Chapel. The members of Cravens Methodist, and Wishwell Baptist, also located on Sonderen Street, also used this cemetery to bury their families. None of these churches or their records exist anymore. Sage Chapel Cemetery is a former African American community cemetery that is  maintained by the City of O’Fallon, Missouri, located at 8500 Veterans Memorial Parkway.  It has 117 documented burials of which only 37 have headstones, of these we know that 17 were born enslaved. (2018) May they rest in peace “As long as a name can be spoken, that person shall not be forgotten.

[Mary’s broken headstone was first documented by historian Lucille Wiechens in 1988 in the same condition it is today. It has been identified and documented today by research into death records, census records and other genealogical data.]